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Why Arbitrate?

The big difference between mediation and arbitration is that an arbitrator is authorized by all of the parties to render a binding decision. By contrast, a mediator does not render a decision as the mediation agreement is determined by the parties. Arbitration is another cost-effective and time saving alternative to costly litigation that can take months to years to resolve. Unlike a court trial where there is a long wait period that can be longer than two years, arbitration can be scheduled according to the parties’ availability and agreed upon location for the trial. 

 

Arbitration Services are no longer offered:

 

•           Arbitration: The arbitration case is heard as a trial without all of the formality of a court trial. There is a presentation of briefs, opening statements, presentation of evidence, and witnesses for the parties. The arbitrator is the sole decision maker. The parties can agree whether the decision will be binding or non-binding. Under some circumstances, such as construction, personal injury, CAR real estate: arbitration hearings are binding per contract of the parties. Each case is unique and a favorable outcome cannot be guaranteed.